What’s The Difference Between a Bulging Disc and Herniated Disc?

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Although the two terms may sound similar, there are some notable differences between a “bulging disc” and “herniated disc.” If you’re suffering from chronic back pain, it could be the result of one of these conditions. The intervertebral discs see a lot of use through day-to-day activities, constantly absorbing the pressure and force of each step we take. When they are no longer able to serve this purpose, however, it can result in severe, oftentimes debilitating back pain.

To put the problem of back pain into perspective, it’s estimated that 31 million Americans experience back pain at any given time, making it the single leading cause of disability. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) states that nearly 80% of Americans will experience it at some point in their life. While there are dozens of potential causes for chronic back pain, bulging and herniated discs are too of the most common.

Now back to the question at hand: what’s the difference between a herniated and bulging disc? The spine consists of several soft, oval-shaped intervertebral discs. When you walk, run, jump, bend your back, or perform practically any other physical activity, the intervertebral discs absorb the pressure of your movement; thus, preventing the bones from running against one another. Over time, these discs may begin to lose their effectiveness due to injury, illness or natural aging.

A bulging disc (also referred to as a slipped disc) is a condition that’s characterized by a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc into the spinal canal. This protrusion typically results in minor-to-severe pain along with the potential for swelling. It’s important to note, however, that the outer layer of the intervertebral disc remains intact.

A herniated disc, on the other hand, occurs when the outer layer (annulus fibrosus) ruptures and releases some of its soft, gel-like substance into the spinal canal. It’s not uncommon for bulging discs to turn into the herniated discs if left untreated. When enough force and pressure is placed against the soft intervertebral disc, it may rapture to create this condition.

The key difference between a bulging and herniated disc is the outer layer rupturing. Remember, herniated discs are characterized by the actual rupturing of this outer layer, which in turn sends the gel-like substance leaking into the spinal canal.

Whether you are suffering from a herniated or bulging disc, you should talk with your chiropractor to see what kind of treatment options they recommend. A bulging disc can oftentimes be manipulated back into its normal position without any painful or expensive surgical procedures. A trained chiropractor can feel the bulging disc and gently guide it back to its original position.

Call or email the staff at AtlantaChiroAndWellness.com to schedule an appointment.

Although the two terms may sound similar, there are some notable differences between a “bulging disc” and “herniated disc.” If you’re suffering from chronic back pain, it could be the result of one of these conditions. The intervertebral discs see a lot of use through day-to-day activities, constantly absorbing the pressure and force of each step we take. When they are no longer able to serve this purpose, however, it can result in severe, oftentimes debilitating back pain.

To put the problem of back pain into perspective, it’s estimated that 31 million Americans experience back pain at any given time, making it the single leading cause of disability. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) states that nearly 80% of Americans will experience it at some point in their life. While there are dozens of potential causes for chronic back pain, bulging and herniated discs are too of the most common.

Now back to the question at hand: what’s the difference between a herniated and bulging disc? The spine consists of several soft, oval-shaped intervertebral discs. When you walk, run, jump, bend your back, or perform practically any other physical activity, the intervertebral discs absorb the pressure of your movement; thus, preventing the bones from running against one another. Over time, these discs may begin to lose their effectiveness due to injury, illness or natural aging.

A bulging disc (also referred to as a slipped disc) is a condition that’s characterized by a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc into the spinal canal. This protrusion typically results in minor-to-severe pain along with the potential for swelling. It’s important to note, however, that the outer layer of the intervertebral disc remains intact.

A herniated disc, on the other hand, occurs when the outer layer (annulus fibrosus) ruptures and releases some of its soft, gel-like substance into the spinal canal. It’s not uncommon for bulging discs to turn into the herniated discs if left untreated. When enough force and pressure is placed against the soft intervertebral disc, it may rapture to create this condition.

The key difference between a bulging and herniated disc is the outer layer rupturing. Remember, herniated discs are characterized by the actual rupturing of this outer layer, which in turn sends the gel-like substance leaking into the spinal canal.

 

Whether you are suffering from a herniated or bulging disc, you should talk with your chiropractor to see what kind of treatment options they recommend. A bulging disc can oftentimes be manipulated back into its normal position without any painful or expensive surgical procedures. A trained chiropractor can feel the bulging disc and gently guide it back to its original position.

 

Call or email the staff at AtlantaChiroAndWellness.com to schedule an appointment.

 

Although the two terms may sound similar, there are some notable differences between a “bulging disc” and “herniated disc.” If you’re suffering from chronic back pain, it could be the result of one of these conditions. The intervertebral discs see a lot of use through day-to-day activities, constantly absorbing the pressure and force of each step we take. When they are no longer able to serve this purpose, however, it can result in severe, oftentimes debilitating back pain.

 

To put the problem of back pain into perspective, it’s estimated that 31 million Americans experience back pain at any given time, making it the single leading cause of disability. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) states that nearly 80% of Americans will experience it at some point in their life. While there are dozens of potential causes for chronic back pain, bulging and herniated discs are too of the most common.

 

Now back to the question at hand: what’s the difference between a herniated and bulging disc? The spine consists of several soft, oval-shaped intervertebral discs. When you walk, run, jump, bend your back, or perform practically any other physical activity, the intervertebral discs absorb the pressure of your movement; thus, preventing the bones from running against one another. Over time, these discs may begin to lose their effectiveness due to injury, illness or natural aging.

 

A bulging disc (also referred to as a slipped disc) is a condition that’s characterized by a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc into the spinal canal. This protrusion typically results in minor-to-severe pain along with the potential for swelling. It’s important to note, however, that the outer layer of the intervertebral disc remains intact.

 

A herniated disc, on the other hand, occurs when the outer layer (annulus fibrosus) ruptures and releases some of its soft, gel-like substance into the spinal canal. It’s not uncommon for bulging discs to turn into the herniated discs if left untreated. When enough force and pressure is placed against the soft intervertebral disc, it may rapture to create this condition.

 

The key difference between a bulging and herniated disc is the outer layer rupturing. Remember, herniated discs are characterized by the actual rupturing of this outer layer, which in turn sends the gel-like substance leaking into the spinal canal.

 

Whether you are suffering from a herniated or bulging disc, you should talk with your chiropractor to see what kind of treatment options they recommend. A bulging disc can oftentimes be manipulated back into its normal position without any painful or expensive surgical procedures. A trained chiropractor can feel the bulging disc and gently guide it back to its original position.

 

Call or email the staff at AtlantaChiroAndWellness.com to schedule an appointment.

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